Standard Stitches

We all have seen it on patterns, stuff like Garter Stitch,
Stockinette, Ribbing, double Ribbing, but what does it all mean? If you
are new to the world of loom knitting or knitting in general, these
terms are unknown to you and as such may make a pattern that is really
simple into something quite confusing. Let's take a closer look at what
they all mean and how to get them done on a loom, shall we?

Garter
stitch:
Garter stitch has one of the best characteristics out
there, it creates reversible fabric that has a horizontal ridge. Also,
Garter Stitch fabric lays flat–meaning, it doesn't curl on itself.

How
to loom it: it is done the same in the round (a circular item such as a hat or sock) as in a flat panel (such as a scarf or blanket)

Row/Round 1: Knit

Row/Round 2: Purl

Repeat
Row/Round 1 and 2 until you have reached the desired length

The two rows/rounds make one
Garter Stitch Ridge. Some patterns may tell you to make 20 Garter Stitch
ridges which in turn will mean to work 40 rows/rounds.

Stockinette:
nice and fancy name, it must mean something quite difficult, actually,
you are probably already doing it each time you loom a hat. Stockinette
refers to the smooth side of the fabric, the one that has all the little
v's. Watch out, fabric done completely in stockinette stitch will curl
at the edges.

How to loom it:

As loom
knitters, we are very lucky as we don't need to do go through the
trouble of purling on the wrong side rows to make the smooth fabric. To
create stockinette on a loom, it is the same if you are working in the
round or a flat panel.

Row 1/Round 1: knit
Row 2/Round 2: knit

Repeat
Row/Round 1 and 2 until you have reached the desired length.

Reverse
Stockinette:
Simply refers to the opposite of stockinette, instead
of the nice smooth side, we want the bumpy side to be on the right side
of the fabric. As in stockinette, Reverse Stockinette also curls on
itself, so plan for it.

Looming it: To create reverse stockinette
on a loom, it is the same if you are
working in the round or a flat panel.

Row 1/Round 1: purl
Row 2/Round 2: purl

Repeat Row/Round 1 and 2 until you have
reached the desired length.

Lastly, let's look at
ribbing. What exactly is ribbing and no it is not going to the local rib
joint and eating until your tummy explodes.

Ribbing: Elastic and reversible fabric with vertical ridges,
mostly seen on cuffs or hems of sweaters. There are various types of
ribbing, the most common single and double.  Single involves 2 stitches,
double 4 stitches. 

Looming it:

Single:
Involves 2 stitches:

Row/Round 1: *k1, p1; rep from *. What does
it mean? Knit 1 peg, purl 1 peg, repeat from * to the end of the
row/round.

Repeat Row/Round 1 until you have reached the desired
length.

Double: Involves 4 stitches:

Row/Round 1:
*k2, p2; rep from *. What does it mean? Knit 2
pegs, purl 2 pegs, repeat from * to the end of the row/round.

Repeat Row/Round 1 until you have reached the desired length.

Now
that we have deciphered what the terms mean, go and loom something with
them and come back and share with me your pictures and your loomy
discoveries.

Keep on looming!

17 thoughts

  1. I added one or two to the list you asked me to put here. Would like definitions for slip stitch, pass slipped stitch over, back cross, buttonhole, chunky braid stitch, cross left, cross right, double stitch, half stitch, yarn over. Thanks for all you do!!!

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  2. Thanks, Isela for the great list! One question, when you say “knit” am I always to assume (unless you specify otherwise) that you mean the flat knit stitch and not the ewrap?

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  3. Just one more question – When knitting a flat panel either in garter stitch or stockinette, do you usually slip the first stitch of each row? If a pattern doesn’t specify, am I usually safe in slipping the first stitch? I like the way the edge looks when you slip the first stitch.
    THANKS!

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  4. How do I tell the differnce between the knit or purl stitches when I resume my work? I am trying to make the prayer shawl pattern which came with my loom. How will I remember if I need to knit or purl? Please Help 🙂

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  5. Could you please explain what yo (yarn over) means? Where does the yarn go over? I understand k2tog but the yo I do not understand. This instruction is in your book “Loom Knitting” on page 66 in the pattern for the Cascading Shawl by Stacey Sobiesiak. As you can tell, I am not very experienced! I have recently started loom knitting as a displacement activity to help me stop smoking. So far it is working! 15 weeks with no cigarettes!

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  6. make a knit stich and look at it the yarn is in back of the peg.
    make a purl stich and look at it the yarn is on the side of the peg.
    Hope it helps
    gale

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  7. Isela,
    I just got the knifty knitter looms for Christmas and am enjoying them. i also got your Primer book. It explains a lot but I still have a few question. They are about the mock cable poncho pattern.
    #1 What does loom with a peg number mulitple of 8 + 2 mean?
    #2 I want to make the adult size med. and saw the conversion chart in back. How do I make a wide enough panel (I get how to make it longer)? It seems for the child size 8 you have to cast on 36 stitches. Is my biggest loom even big enough (yellow with 41 pegs)
    #3 I see on the Garter stitch Scarf that you say cast on 12 (40) stitches. What does this mean? I thought you would cast on 12 stitches but what does the 40 mean?
    Thanks,
    Wendy

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  8. What a perfect patters this is what I need in order to develop my skills, I live doing it so I don’t know to apply some specific techniques, I know It’s gonna be really useful for me and my purposes because I know I can take advantage of it.

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  9. I just LOVE your tutorials! You’ve made looming using different stitches so easy to understand. Thank you Isela,for your web site, sharing your talents and keeping it free is quite an inspiration to we, who share your love for looming.
    Shine on!
    Jessica

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